Can AI become a new tool for hackers?

Over the last three years, the use of AI in cybersecurity has been an increasingly hot topic. Every new company that enters the market touts its AI as the best and most effective. Existing vendors, especially those in the enterprise space, are deploying AI  to reinforce their existing security solutions. Use of artificial intelligence (AI) in cybersecurity is enabling IT professionals to predict and react to emerging cyber threats quicker and more effectively than ever before. So how can they expect to respond when AI falls into the wrong hands?

Imagine a constantly evolving and evasive cyberthreat that could target individuals and organisations remorselessly. This is the reality of cybersecurity in an era of artificial intelligence (AI).

There has been no reduction in the number of breaches and incidents despite the focus on AI. Rajashri Gupta, Head of AI, Avast sat down with Enterprise Times to talk about AI and cyber security and explained that part of the challenge was not just having enough data to train an AI but the need for diverse data.

This is where many new entrants into the market are challenged. They can train an AI on small sets of data but is it enough? How do they teach the AI to detect the difference between a real attack and false positive? Gupta talked about this and how Avast is dealing with the problem.

During the podcast, Gupta also touched on the challenge of ethics for AI and how we deal with privacy. He also talked about IoT and what AI can deliver to help spot attacks against those devices. This is especially important for Avast who are to launch a new range of devices for the home security market this year.

AI has shaken up with automated threat prevention, detection and response revolutionising one of the fastest growing sectors in the digital economy.

Hackers are using AI to speed up polymorphic malware, causing it to constantly change its code so it can’t be identified.

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