The death of tin foil? New anti-facial recognition tech set to launch in 2016

Security, security, security.

I love it, you need it, many people are talking about it. I could talk about it all the time.

But in this day and age there is another important topic coming up on the rails: privacy.

Prior to, but especially since, Edward Snowden came onto the scene, people have become increasingly aware of how their privacy is being invaded, both online and off.

I’m sure you’re all aware of the online issues – the actions of the NSA, GCHQ, et al., have been widely publicised – but what about in real, every day life?

Have you seen the roadside cameras designed to ‘improve safety’ by flinging fines at every speeding motorist? Or the CCTV cameras in your local shopping centre? Do you realise the UK has the most video surveillance per capita anywhere in the world?

If so, you may have already taken precautions. After all, the solution has been around for over a century:

But if you’re slow to the party, then a new piece of tech may be of interest.

Designed by the National Institute of Informatics (NII) in Japan, Privacy Visor is for the discerning customer who cares about their civil liberties.

Equipped with special lenses, the £240 visor reflects and absorbs light in a way that thwarts security cameras which would otherwise engage facial recognition tactics to id the wearer.

Due to go on general sale next year, researchers suggest it is effective around 90% of the time.

IT World quotes NII researcher Isao Echizen who thinks the new device is rather nifty:

This is a way to prevent privacy invasion through the many image sensors in smartphones and other devices that can unintentionally photograph people in the background.

Speaking to The Wall Street Journal, Echizen gave a bit more detail as to why he thinks Privacy Visor could be the must-have gadget of next year, explaining how “We are often told not to unveil our personal information to others, but our faces are also a type of an ID. There should be a way to protect that”.

The latest device is a successor to prototypes first mooted back in 2012 which utilised 11 LED lights which could prevent facial recognition tech from identifying that a subject was even a person.

That early iteration ultimately proved to be unwieldy though, not to mention garish, and so the new, far more sylish model was born.

Whether it proves to be popular among privacy advocates or as derided as Google’s antithesis – Glass – remains to be seen.

So, will you be buying a pair for yourself, or perhaps as a present for the man who has to have every new gadget?

Or will you stick with the old tin foil?

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