When culture eats awareness for breakfast

European startup CLTRe founded by Kai Roer has spent the last couple of years examining the security awareness and user behaviour problem through the lens of security culture.

Based on findings over the course of 2016, CLTRe has produced its first annual Security Culture report, co-written by Roer and Gregor Petric, Ph.D., an Associate Professor of Social Informatics and Chair of the Center for Methodology and Informatics at the Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Ljubljana (Slovenia).

Many existing security awareness reports typically measure and report on a few basic metrics – pretty often based around number of phishing emails user click on.

It is here that the CLTRe report differentiates itself, by delving into statistics and metrics to provide a view that is probably the first of its kind. It takes into consideration not just behaviours, but adds insights to the behaviours based on gender, geographic location, age, duration of service, or acceptance of norms across seven dimensions.

The report has insightful nuggets of information scattered throughout, such as an  examination of the cultural difference across various industries in Norway and Sweden.

The report explains at length why security culture metrics matter and the value they provide. It states that similar to technical controls, security culture must be measured in order to understand and measure change.

For example, reporting the number of clicks on a phishing exercise is useful but has its limits. Those metrics do not provide the motivations or drivers for the users.

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Thoughts

For its first report, CLTRe has produced a great report with very detailed insights. It’s not something to be considered light reading, and some segments feel quite academic in nature. It’s not a knock on the report, it’s needed to elevate the discussion to the higher level needed.

For next years report, I’d like to see the inclusion of case studies or quotes from companies that have been measuring their security culture and how they have used the information to improve the security culture.

Check out the full report here (registration needed).

Let Kai and the CLTRe team know what you think: Click to tweet:

Great job @getcltre @kairoer on the human factor report. (via @J4vv4D)

Why did you write this report? @kairoer @getcltre (via @j4vv4d) 

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